Project

Nursery


Nursing is done in 2 separate stages to reduce stocking density. Earthen nursery ponds, typically 1 000-5 000 m2, are pre-prepared by drying (1-3 days, depending on season), liming (1 t/ha), filling and stocking with Moina (20-30 kg/ha). Water supplied to nursery ponds is filtered through fine meshed cloth to exclude predators. In the first nursing phase larvae are stocked at 400-500/m2 just prior to yolk sac absorption, so that natural feeds are available and the larvae have enough space to avoid cannibalism. Water is only topped up and is not exchanged during the nursery phase unless water quality deterioration is obviously causing stress. Boiled egg yolk and soybean meal mixed into an emulsion is fed 5 -6 times a day for the first 2 weeks. Thereafter commercial pellets are fed. After 4 weeks, following a 24 hour starvation period the nursery ponds are partially (about 1/3 depth) gravity drained and then pumped dry, and the 0.3-1 g fry are harvested by seine net and transferred and stocked at 150-200/m2 in another pre-prepared pond without Moina. Typical larvae to fry survival rate during the first nursing stage is 40-50 per cent. In the second nursing stage, from fry to 14-20 g fingerlings, survival rates over the 2 month nursing period are typically 60-70 per cent. In the Mekong delta of Vietnam the majority of fingerlings are transported from nursery facilities to grow-out farms in transport tanks with continuously pumped water that are carried in boats. Fingerling transport is done early in the morning to avoid direct sunlight. Transportation of fingerlings overland is less commonly conducted; this involves using metal drums with car battery powered aeration. Additionally, transportation overland for very short distances can be carried out in metal drums without aeration

Labeo rohita


Rohu (Labeo rohita) is the most important among the three Indian major carp species used in carp polyculture systems. This graceful Indo-Gangetic riverine species is the natural inhabitant of the riverine system of northern and central India, and the rivers of Pakistan, Bangladesh and Myanmar. In India, it has been transplanted into almost all riverine systems including the freshwaters of Andaman, where its population has successfully established. The species has also been introduced in many other countries, including Sri Lanka, the former USSR, Japan, China, the Philippines, Malaysia, Nepal and some countries of Africa. The traditional culture of this carp goes back hundreds of years in the small ponds of the eastern Indian states.

Information on its culture is available only from the early part of the 20th century. The compatibility of rohu with other carps like catla (Catla catla) and mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) made it an ideal candidate for carp polyculture systems. While riverine collection of seed was solely meeting the requirement for culture of the species until the first half of the 20th century, the success in induced breeding in 1957 and the assured seed supply thereafter was the major factor for the development of its culture in freshwater ponds and tanks. Its high growth potential, coupled with high consumer preference, have established rohu as the most important freshwater species cultured in India, Bangladesh and other adjacent countries in the region. Considering its importance in the culture system, emphasis has also been given to its genetic improvement through selective breeding in India.

image

image

Catla catla


Body short and deep, somewhat laterally compressed, its depth more than head length; head very large, its depth exceeding half the head length; body with conspicuously large cycloid scales, head devoid of scales; snout bluntly rounded; eyes large and visible from underside of the head; mouth wide and upturned with prominent protruding lower jaw; upper lip absent, lower lip very thick; no barbels; lower jaw with a movable articulation at symphysis,without a prominent process; gill rakers long and fine; pharyngeal teeth in three row, 5.3.2/2.3.5 pattern; dorsal fin inserted slightly in advance of pelvic fins, with 14 to 16 branched rays, the simple rays non-osseous; anal fin short; pectoral fins long extending to pelvic fins; caudal fin forked; lateral line with 40 to 43 scales. Greyish on back and flanks, silvery-white below; fins dusky.

image

image

Cirrhinus mrigala


Body bilaterally symmetrical and streamlined, its depth about equal to length of head; body with cycloid scales, head without scales; snout blunt, often with pores; mouth broad, transverse; upper lip entire and not continuous with lower lip, lower lip most indistinct; single pair of short rostral barbels; pharyngeal teeth in three rows, 5.4.2/2.4.5 pattern; lower jaw with a small post-symphysial knob or tubercle; origin of dorsal fin nearer to end of snout than base of caudal; dorsal fin as high as body with 12 or 13 branched rays; last unbranched ray of dorsal fin non-osseous and non-serrated; pectoral fins shorter than head; caudal fin deeply forked; anal fin not extending to caudal fin; lateral line with 40-45 scales; lateral transverse scale rows 6-7/5?-6 between lateral line and pelvic fin base; usually dark grey above, silvery beneath; dorsal fin greyish; pectoral, pelvic and anal fins orange-tipped (especially during breeding season).

image

image

Oreochromis niloticus


Body compressed; caudal peduncle depth equal to length. Scales cycloid. A knob-like protuberance absent on dorsal surface of snout. Upper jaw length showing no sexual dimorphism. First gill arch with 27 to 33 gillrakers. Lateral line interrupted. Spinous and soft ray parts of dorsal fin continuous. Dorsal fin with 16 - 17 spines and 11 to 15 soft rays. Anal fin with 3 spines and 10-11 rays. Caudal fin truncated. Colour in spawning season, pectoral, dorsal and caudal fins becoming reddish; caudal fin with numerous black bars.

image

image